• Law, Debt and Merchant Power: The Civil Courts of Eighteenth-Century Halifax

    By James Muir, Professor of Law and History, University of Alberta, published by the University of Toronto Press. This is a path-breaking study of the every day work of civil law and civil courts. It examines the type of litigation pursued (mostly debt), how the courts worked, and how the economy operated in a society… Read more »

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  • Law, Life and Government at Red River

    By Dale Gibson, Emeritus Professor of Law, University of Manitoba. The General Quarterly Court of Assiniboia can justly be called the first ‘British’ court in western Canada. Although there were predecessor institutions and judicial arrangements for hearing criminal and civil cases, the establishment of the Quarterly Court in the 1830s put the administration of justice… Read more »

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  • The Supreme Court of Canada: History of  the Institution

    By James Snell, Professor, Department of History, University of Guelph, and Frederick Vaughan, Professor, Department of Political Science, University of Guelph. Published with the University of Toronto Press, 1985. Canadians know little about the history and traditions of their highest court. In providing the first comprehensive history of the Supreme Court of Canada, James Snell and Frederick Vaughan… Read more »

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  • The Rule of the Admirals: Law, Custom, and Naval Government in Newfoundland, 1699-1832

    by Jerry Bannister, Professor of History, Dalhousie University. Published with the University of Toronto Press, 2003. The past two decades have witnessed a remarkable expansion in the study of the trans-Atlantic links of the British empire. This wave of historiography has passed by Newfoundland. Although most scholars acknowledge the role of the cod fishery in the… Read more »

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  • The Law Makers: Judicial Power and the Shaping of Canadian Federalism

    by John T. Saywell, Emeritus Professor of History, York University. Published with University of Toronto Press, 2002. For those who believe that the history of the Judicial Committee of the Privy Council’s decisions on the Canadian constitution is an oft-told story, this book will be a revelation indeed. One of Canada’s outstanding scholars, Professor Saywell draws… Read more »

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  • The Federal Court of Canada: A History, 1875-1992

    by Ian Bushnell. Published with the University of Toronto Press, 1997. The Federal Court of Canada, existing from 1875 to 1971 under the name Exchequer Court of Canada, has occupied a special place in the court structure of Canada. Established principally to adjudicate legal disputes in which the Canadian government was involved, it has, since its… Read more »

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  • Essays in the History of Canadian Law, Volume IX, Two Islands: Newfoundland and Prince Edward Island

    edited by Christopher English, Department of History, Memorial University of Newfoundland. Published with the University of Toronto Press, 2005. Voices from the East beyond the Northumberland and Cabot Straits. This volume of essays on the legal histories of Prince Edward Island and Newfoundland opens with innovative essays on the historiography of two ‘island’ jurisdictions of Atlantic… Read more »

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  • Cornerstones Of Order: Courthouses And Town Halls Of Ontario, 1784-1914

    by Marion Macrae And Anthony Adamson. Published with Clarke Irwin Inc., 1982. Cornerstones of Order: Courthouses and Town Halls of Ontario 1784-1914 by Marion MacRae and Anthony Adamson was the second volume in the Society’s publication series. The Society was delighted to be associated in this publication with these two distinguished authors, who had already left… Read more »

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  • The British Columbia Court of Appeal: The first hundred years

    by Christopher Moore, Independent Historian. Published with the University of British Columbia Press, 2010. The Court of Appeal of British Columbia began sitting in 1910, and this volume thus coincides with the court’s centenary. Renowned historian Christopher Moore has produced a masterful account of the court, one that combines narrative, biographical and analytical histories of a… Read more »

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